The Importance Of Film Photography

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Photography has been simplified in recent years, with various innovations in mobile technology and photo editing software making it easier for amateur photographers to take and design images of professional quality (or at least close to it!). We’re not just talking about standard Photoshop here, but rather a never-ending onslaught of photo effect, editing and design apps coming out for mobile devices of all kinds. Combine these apps with phones like the Nokia Lumia 1020, designed to put high quality digital camera capabilities in our phones, and suddenly your average person with a smartphone can call him or herself a photographer.

This all sounds well and good, but there is also some risk that it is undermining the true importance of photography, and the positive effect it can have on our families. It may sound a bit cheesy to say so, but there is real value in high quality, tangible photographs singled out and preserved in albums, frames and physical collections – as opposed to endless volumes of digital photos taken carelessly as a result of the convenience of modern photography.

This isn’t to say anyone should necessarily stop or avoid the convenient digital photography offered in modern phones and tablets. By all means, use these capabilities and features to practice, to record events, and to have fun with friends and family – but don’t do so at the expense of “old school” photography! Consider making an effort to have professional photos done the right way for important events and experiences, and take steps to collect and preserve older photographs.

One helpful tool that can help to bridge the gap between the value of printed photos and the convenience of modern digital photography is a film scanner. You’ll find several worthwhile options at MySmartBuy, and discover that these handy machines allow you to take negatives and slides of photographs and “scan” them into digital form. The value of this is clear – it allows you, essentially, to become a “hybrid shooter” with film and digital means, and to store your most important photos both ways – physically, and in digital photo libraries.

The value in preserving film photography truly is in the storage and display. With so many of us storing photos exclusively in online libraries, on our Facebook accounts, etc., it’s easy to lose track of some of the most important pictures that define chapters in our lives. As we grow older and move on in life, photos in these sorts of digital libraries can simply be left behind, whereas those placed carefully in themed albums and photo frames can be stored, handed down, etc. Convenience is wonderful, but the value of photography is in strategic – rather than easy – storage and display.

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